Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)


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Given the importance of trade finance for trade and economic growth, ICC publishes an annual Global Survey on Trade Finance with data from over countries.

The Little Data Book on Financial Inclusion 2018

The report also reveals that the industry needs to do more to agree on common standards so that all the benefits of trade digitalisation can be realised. ICC regularly uses its data to develop concrete policy recommendations to stimulate trade finance alongside international organisations and other public and private sector partners. The report corroborates findings from previous years that Trade Finance products present banks with short average maturities, and little credit risk, with low default rates and loss rates. By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies to make easier to navigate and to make statistics of visits.

Learn more and set cookies. International Chamber of Commerce. Follow us. These risks are shaped and modeled by different institutions that govern the investment ecosystem. Risks can arise out of undertrained human capital, weak courts and justice systems, inadequate legal frameworks covering contracts and anti-trust issues, complicated tax codes, underdeveloped financial markets, inept central banking systems, pervasive corruption, and others. Low-income countries and countries grappling with conflict and fragility have the greatest SDGs funding gaps.

Unfortunately, these are also the same countries where fractures and fault lines exist within the political economy that can pose risks to investments and deter their prospects of achieving sustainable development. DFIs, which are constantly improving their well-developed risk-investment framework to strengthen their business strategy, are best positioned to both assess and mitigate the risk posed by less-developed countries.

Money alone will not fix weak fundamentals of political and economic governance. Developing countries must make their regulatory frameworks more transparent and less ambiguous to create an enabling environment for investments and innovation to grow. To that end, the technical expertise available at the multilateral development banks, bilateral aid agencies, and the DFIs is unique. There are three areas where these institutions can play a significant role. First, reforms are needed in essential legal frameworks that govern bankruptcy, contracts, land-acquisition, auctioning of natural resources, and insurance laws.

Investors are more likely to park their capital in markets that are transparent and predictable. An ambiguous regulatory environment leaves much of the rules to speculation and political whims. Moreover, countries should undertake serious measures to ensure the independence of their central banks while also strengthening their judicial systems by providing greater access to fiscal resources.

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Second, efforts must be directed towards building local government capacity. Today, 54 percent of the world lives in an urban setting. By , urbanization is expected to reach 66 percent globally. Many of these countries continue to make their development goals contingent upon decisions taken by bureaucracies in the national capital.

National governments need to decentralize and devolve their development functions to officials in local municipal bodies and subnational governments to ensure a higher and more targeted impact on its population. Such devolution of powers must be accompanied by investments in training and capacity-building modules for such public officials who, often, are inept at performing critical but modern bureaucratic functions like a life-cycle cost analysis before infrastructure procurement.

Finally, many developing countries are unable to harness the full potential of their local capital and finance due to the lack of infrastructure and enabling institutional design.

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Local capital helps finance major development projects at a lower cost due to the reduced dependency on foreign debt. It also helps protect its economies from experiencing a large-scale exodus of foreign capital that may be triggered by the actions or inaction of the political class of countries with autocratic regimes or young democracies that have elected leaders with no clear mandate as is often the case. DFIs must take the lead in developing local capital markets and financial institutions and convene networking platforms for local entrepreneurs.

The development finance community, thus, has an opportunity to help countries set up local capital markets and local financial institutions. Supplementing such efforts, DFIs can also develop networks of local entrepreneurs by convening networking opportunities at the local or regional level.

Developing such networks consolidates the efforts of individual entrepreneurs and makes them more efficient and targeted. It also accentuates success stories for the benefit of other investors and entrepreneurs. The challenges faced by the developing world are complex and diverse. Consequently, development solutions need to respond to the needs of local communities. While holding fast to that principle, DFIs should scale up their ongoing strategies that are demand-driven in approach. By facilitating a partnership between the investor, project stakeholders and managers, local government officials, and the extended civil society, this demand-driven approach increases the chance for the investment to be successful.

The development finance community should back business models that use new technologies to help solve local problems more effectively. A quintessential example of this phenomena is the M-Pesa system, developed due to the instrumental role played by DFIs. Mobile telephony in Africa, as outlined above, is pervasive and this technology has only helped democratize the formal banking sector in a continent where the goal of financial inclusion was mostly unrealized.

Similar game-changing technologies, which rely on grassroots partnerships at a local level, are impacting health care challenges and food security concerns across the developing world. Such small-scale solutions, driven by individuals and communities on the ground who co-opt new technologies with a digital platform, have proven to be indispensable and are emerging as a key player in the broader consolidation efforts Box 3.

Pursuing a demand-driven development is a strong strategy for several reasons. Second, it allows DFIs to assume the role of seed funders in the developing world, particularly since early-stage funders for untested technological solutions are hard to come across.

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The little data book on financial development 2015

Third, it empowers local communities and the developing world at-large to be in control of how they prioritize competing policy options. Finally, it gives greater stakeholders of a given development investment greater ownership of the project and better control to respond to ground realities promptly.

Blockchain technology can be described as a cloud-based network of distributed digital ledgers that is universally accessible and virtually tamperproof. The energy sector, in particular, has used blockchain technology most effectively in addressing the challenges of developing a feasible business model in smaller markets while addressing the broader risks of operating commercially. Scaling up these players and replicating their models will get the developing world much closer to achieving global energy access goals.

As DFIs reorient themselves to increase their investments in innovations and ideas—all the way to the scale stage—they should continue to work effectively with the investment community. By their very design, venture capitalists and impact investors are agile and flexible. While supplementing all of the efforts and investments mentioned above, it is worthwhile to note that blended finance can also be used as a tool to mobilize private capital investment. Blended finance can be broadly defined as an approach where international donors mix concessional terms with private investment to reduce or mitigate risk, adjust risk-reward profiles, and attract needed private investment into certain regions or countries.

Countries that have been plagued by prolonged periods of conflicts, violent extremism, and weak state capacity inherently pose higher risks to any innovation-financing and investment than even a lower-middle income country. Even so, such countries are not exempt from the broader pursuit of lasting and sustainable economic development, peace, and prosperity.

Within the product or service business cycle, any innovative idea that aims to be commercially successful follows five stages: 1 startup, 2 early-mid growth, 3 mid-late growth, 4 scale, and 5 expansion Figure 3. For instance, the startup stage is riskier than other stages as the product idea is still not fully tested for commercial viability. Consequently, the most pliable way has been to seek crowdfunding and angel investments. Alternatively, businesses that are at the scale stage where the product has become market-ready and is expected to boost sales and increase profits find it easier to get funding from traditional financial institutions such as multilateral development banks and venture capitalists.

Innovative ideas that are in the startup stage have some access to capital from angel networks, incubators, and crowdfunding institutions. The real challenge is the lack of credible funding mechanisms in the critical early-middle growth stages of innovative ideas often the stage when untested ideas turn into profit-making businesses that hinders the development of an innovation led-economic model. Source: Neil C.

The Little Data Book on Financial Development - World Bank Group - Google книги

Churchill and Virginia L. This missing link in the innovation pipeline can be an opportunity for DFIs to create investment vehicles for the early-middle growth stage innovations. Structurally, bilateral development finance agencies are government-sponsored institutions that facilitate private investments into commercially sustainable private-sector projects in the developing world.

However, since these institutions draw their funds from the public exchequers of donor countries, they remain accountable to vigilant national legislatures and their portfolio of investments are put through intense scrutiny. Some DFIs are incentivized to prioritize low-risk and high-yield investments in relatively better-developed sectors in upper-middle income countries. Overcoming the funding gap will require DFIs to reconsider its strategy of engagement in low-income and lower-middle income countries and demonstrate the willingness to finance riskier innovations.

This can be done through new partnerships with investors operating in the mid-late growth stage and align efforts to focus on crowding in more private capital. DFIs are uniquely placed to provide financial assistance and technical expertise in ways that can attract private capital investments in emerging markets. To help DFIs be more instrumental in this phenomenon, this paper proposes a series of five critical actions that can be undertaken:. Furthermore, this is a call to action for the DFI community and beyond. Daniel F.

Runde is a senior vice president, director of the Project on Prosperity and Development, and holds the William A. Sundar R. Its research is nonpartisan and nonproprietary. CSIS does not take specific policy positions. Accordingly, all views, positions, and conclusions expressed in this publication should be understood to be solely those of the author s. All rights reserved.


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Foreign Affairs , Summer Runde and Sundar R. Savoy and Aaron N. Skip to main content. Photo: Adobe Stock. Download the Brief. Box 2: DFIs and the Digital Revolution At the start of the twenty-first century, virtually no mobile phone users existed in the African continent. Box 3: Blockchain Addresses Energy Access Issues Blockchain technology can be described as a cloud-based network of distributed digital ledgers that is universally accessible and virtually tamperproof. Written By. Senior Vice President; William A.

Leadership in Development. Media Queries. Contact H.

Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report) Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)
Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report) Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)
Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report) Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)
Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report) Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)
Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report) Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)
Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report) Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)
Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report) Little Data Book on Financial Development 2013 (Global Financial Development Report)

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